Competition: Review “Standard+Case” – Win a Kindle Fire

Kindle Fire
Write a review, chance to win a Kindle Fire

Regular ITSM Review columnist Rob England (a.k.a. ‘The IT Skeptic’) has just published his latest contribution to the ITSM industry:

“Plus! The Standard+Case Approach: See service response in a new light”

Book blurb:

“If your customers see your group as bureaucratic and inflexible…

If your staff feel process bound…

If your process doesn’t adapt to a changing world…

See service response in a new light.
Standard+Case is an exciting new approach to categorising and resolving any sort of response activity, such as service desk, tech support, public safety, social welfare, or health. If you have anything to do with responding to situations when providing a service, read this. It will change your view of how responses are handled.

Standard+Case applies to anything that requires a human response: there’s either a standard response or there isn’t.”

What they said…

“By tying together the mature practices of ITSM and Case Management Rob has strengthened and filled in gaps of both frameworks. A must read for ITSM professionals!” Troy DuMoulin, Pink Elephant.

“Great reading and concept. Now I want to build it.” Matt Beran, ITSM Consultant.

More info on the book:

Competition

To help Skep get the word out on his new book we’re running a competition!

In a nutshell: Write a review of Rob’s book, post it on this article, the best one wins a Kindle Fire.

Competition rules:

  1. Deadline to receive reviews: Sunday 28th July
  2. How to enter: Post your review as a comment on this blog entry or by email
  3. The ITSM Review will choose the winning review (i.e. Not Rob)
  4. Rob doesn’t mince his words on book reviews, neither should you. We welcome all reviews, good or bad. We aspire to useful and perceptive content on The ITSM Review – this should be no different.
  5. The ITSM Review’s decision is final, yada-yada
  6. We reserve the right to change the rules retrospectively to cover our backsides with the guiding principles that we are a) Good eggs and b) not evil 🙂

GOOD LUCK!

Image credit

'Basic Service Management' by Rob England (a.k.a The IT Skeptic)

Basic Service Management by Rob England

This is a quick review of Rob England’s book ‘Basic Service Management’.

You can find out more about Rob’s book and the TIPU method here: www.basicsm.com. If you want to share your own review please add a comment below.

In my opinion this is a well written introduction to service management.

This book might have also been called:

  • ‘Service Management in a nutshell’
  • ‘An introduction to Service Management’
  • ‘Service Management for Business Owners’
  • ‘The book on Service Management that you buy for your boss’ or
  • ‘How to introduce someone to service management without scaring the bejesus out of them by banging on about ITIL or other IT geekery’

I read this in one sitting and I’m not a fast reader. It is quick, accessible and thought provoking.

It is not an ITSM or IT book per se, in fact I think the best recipient of this book is a non-IT business owner or service owner who wants to appreciate the benefits of service management.

As an ITSM professional, this is the sort of book you need to send to those you wish to educate and influence about your chosen profession. Or as one Amazon reviewer put it: “I recommend reading it before you get lost in ITIL”. This would also be useful to an entrepreneur looking to start or scale their business.

Why Service Management?

“If you are reading this book, you probably don’t manage your services so much. That gives you an opportunity to increase revenues and profitability: improving your service brings increased efficiency and effectiveness. That means increased returns for much less investment than from improving your products or equipment”.

Rob England, The IT Skeptic

Rob is a great wordsmith and well respected in the ITSM industry – my only criticism of this book is that I wish he had used the power of metaphor, story telling or examples to describe his seven practice areas. The second half of the book tends to slide into a glossary of his basic service management terms and bullet points. I thought this might have been a perfect opportunity for Rob to use some examples in order to reinforce his message and walk the reader through his ‘Seven Areas’ rather than explaining principles in purely theoretical terms.

In the ‘How to Use this Book’ section Rob urges the reader to “Read it, It is short”. In a similar fashion my advice to you as an ITSM professional is, “Buy it, it is good”.

Have you read Rob’s book? Please share your opinion in the comments below.

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